Differences between current version and predecessor to the previous major change of Leslie.

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Newer page: version 13 Last edited on July 4, 2011 6:42 am. by 82.238.145.152
Older page: version 11 Last edited on August 18, 2010 11:04 am. by JeffDairiki
@@ -14,9 +14,9 @@
 Finally, due to the multiple reflections of the listening area and the rotating sound source, the sound appears to emanate from multiple locations imparting a sense of motion to the sound. 
  
 !The Basic Configuration 
  
-The Leslie Loudspeakers company produced many configurations of this speaker. Models came with reverberation, two-piece cabinets, tube and solid-state amplifiers, and more. The most popular Leslie Speaker is probably the Leslie 122. The models [122|Leslie122], 142, [145|Leslie145], and [147|Leslie147] all share a similar configuration. A 40-Watt monophonic amplifier drives two transducers, a 15" woofer and a 3/4" throat diameter Jensen compression driver, through a 16 ohm, 800 Hz passive crossover. The stationary compression driver fires upward into a rotating horn assembly and the stationary woofer fires downward into a rotating drum-like reflector. The rotating assemblies are mechanically belt driven by AC induction motors. Usually, two speeds are available, fast and slow. Models before 1963 were single-speed only, and did not have the "1" in the model number. Also, many older models used a "brake" circuit to bring the rotors to a stop quickly. Today's Leslie cabinets made by Hammond/Suzuki use a single motor with 
+The Leslie Loudspeakers company produced many configurations of this speaker. Models came with reverberation, two-piece cabinets, tube and solid-state amplifiers, and more. The most popular Leslie Speaker is probably the Leslie 122. The models [122|Leslie122], 142, [145|Leslie145], and [147|Leslie147] all share a similar configuration. A 40-Watt monophonic amplifier drives two transducers, a 15" woofer and a 3/4" throat diameter Jensen compression driver, through a 16 ohm, 800 Hz passive crossover. The stationary compression driver fires upward into a rotating horn assembly and the stationary woofer fires downward into a rotating drum-like reflector. The rotating assemblies are mechanically belt driven by AC induction motors. Usually, two speeds are available, fast and slow. Models before 1963 were single-speed only (http://www.tonewheelgeneral.com/agelist/agelist.php) , and did not have the "1" in the model number. Also, many older models used a "brake" circuit to bring the rotors to a stop quickly. Today's Leslie cabinets made by Hammond/Suzuki use a single motor with 
 a motor controller card to determine fast, slow or off. ScottHampton (Hamptone) and BobSchleicher (tonewheel.com) manufacture aftermarket [SolidStateRelay]s that eliminate relay click and, in the case of the Schleicher relay, allow three-speed operation from the console. 
  
 The usual cabinet has three compartments. The upper compartment houses the rotating treble horn assembly. The middle compartment behaves as a vented enclosure for the woofer, contains the crossover, both drivers, and motors for both rotating assemblies. The lower compartment houses the amplifier and the rotating drum. Louvres are located on the three finished sides for upper and lower compartments. 
  

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