HammondWiki - Diff: HammondModels

Differences between current version and predecessor to the previous major change of HammondModels.

Other diffs: Previous Revision, Previous Author

Newer page: version 14 Last edited on May 14, 2016 9:19 pm. by JimCook
Older page: version 10 Last edited on June 21, 2012 7:14 am. by 207.61.101.2
@@ -31,28 +31,31 @@
  
 * Model BV (1946-1949) 
  B style case with vibrato/chorus. 
  
-* Model M (1948-1951) 
- First ever Hammond [spinet|SpinetOrgans] organ introduced . 44-key offset manuals and 12-key pedals. A B series stripped down to the essentials. No presets. Built-in speaker and 11 watt amplifier. 
+* [ Model M|SpinetOrgans] (1948-1951) 
+ First Hammond organ intended for the home market . 44-key offset manuals and 12-key pedals. A B series stripped down to the essentials. No presets. Built-in speaker and 11 watt amplifier. 
  
 * Model RT (1949-1949) 
  Similar in appearance and features to the CV except the console was widened to provide room for a 32-key radial pedal clavier. Has a monophonic pedal solo unit to provide 32' voices, reed and string voices. 
  
 * Models B-2, C-2, RT-2 (1949-1954) 
  B, C, and RT consoles with [selective scanner vibrato|SelectiveVibrato] added and a tablet for NORMAL/SOFT volume. 
  
-* Model M-2 (1951-1954) 
- M [ spinet|SpinetOrgans] with [selective scanner vibrato|SelectiveVibrato] added. 
+* Models S, S-4, S-100 (1950-1966)  
+ The Model S [chord organ|ChordOrgans] introduced a innovative method of playing chords with the left hand on a 12 x 8 button array. One column in the array for each note in the octave from D# to Fb arranged in fifths. Each row in the array plays a variety of different chords. The right hand plays melody on a polyphonic 37-key manual. Two pedals which played either the tonic and fifth of the chord being held.  
+  
+* [ Model M-2|SpinetOrgans] (1951-1954) 
+ Model M spinet organ with [selective scanner vibrato|SelectiveVibrato] added. 
  
 * Models [B-3], [C-3] (1955-1974) 
  Same as B-2, C-2 but with the infamous Hammond [Percussion] and the smooth drawbars and all metal expression pedal frame (except '54 B-3, C-3s) 
  
 * Model RT-3 (1955-1973) 
  RT-2 with [percussion] added. 
  
-* Model M-3 (1955-1964) 
- M-2 with [percussion] and smooth drawbars (if applicable). Perhaps the best choice for those wanting B-3 champagne on a beer budget. Similar in sound but missing foldback and presets. Used on several famous recordings that most people think were recorded on a B-3 (see AllTimeHammondPopHits for a list of some of these.) 
+* [ Model M-3|SpinetOrgans] (1955-1964) 
+ M-2 with [percussion] and smooth drawbars (if applicable). Perhaps the best choice for those wanting B-3 champagne on a beer budget. Similar in sound but missing foldback, presets and an octave of tonewheels . Used on several famous recordings that most people think were recorded on a B-3 (see AllTimeHammondPopHits for a list of some of these.) 
  
 * Model [A-100] series (1959-1964) 
  Get a B-3's guts, shove 'em into a sawed off cabinet, and throw a (not quite) [PR-40] in it (what can I say, it's gettin' late on the east coast). An M-3 on steroids! Everything that's in a B-3 in some of the nicest (and ugliest) cabinets Hammond produced. Includes speaker, amplifier and reverb. 
  
@@ -62,17 +65,15 @@
 * Model L-100 (1961-1972) 
  M-100 without scanner vibrato and non self starting (IE self starting motor) 
  
 * Model F-100 Extravoice (1961-1964) 
- Derided by organ fans, this is nonetheless a very significant product. It descends from the Novachord and the Solovox, and is thus not an organ at all, but would be better described as a synthesizer oriented toward string and woodwind sounds (sort of an electronic Mellotron?). Choice of 3 different polyphonic sounds for each of left and right sides of the split keyboard. The "extra" voice is a mono, solovox type circuit which can be layered over the right half of the keyboard. This voice has rather extensive options for timbre, and 4 octave tabs allow a very wide range, or "stacked" sounds. Instant antique vibe. 
+ Derided by organ fans, this 4 octave, single manual, spinet sized instrument is nonetheless a very significant product. It descends from the Novachord and the Solovox, and is thus not an organ at all, but would be better described as a synthesizer oriented toward string and woodwind sounds (sort of an electronic Mellotron?). Choice of 3 different polyphonic sounds for each of left and right sides of the split keyboard. The "extra" voice is a mono, solovox type circuit which can be layered over the right half of the keyboard. This voice has rather extensive options for timbre, and 4 octave tabs allow a very wide range, or "stacked" sounds. 12-pedals and a knee expression lever . Instant antique vibe. 
  
 * Model A-105 (1962-1974) 
  Same as am [A-100] except this one's in a [C-3] style case 
  
 * Model Grand 100 (G-100) (1963-1965) 
- The biggest Hammond Made. It is non-standard with the 32-note pedalboard and this  
- time has an extra large tone generator and a VERY complex vibrato scanner. Has  
- stops instead of drawbars and a huge external double wide rack mount cabinet 
+ The biggest Hammond Made. It is non-standard with the 32-note pedalboard and this time has an extra large tone generator and a VERY complex vibrato scanner. Has stops instead of drawbars and a huge external double wide rack mount cabinet 
  containing the power supply, 5 motor-driven tremulants (single motor drives 5 
  scanners with a single belt) and the audio speakers (3 Dynaco Stereo 70's plus a 
  Dynaco Mono amp for the bass). 
  

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