Differences between current version and predecessor to the previous major change of ConcertOrgans.

Other diffs: Previous Revision, Previous Author

Newer page: version 3 Last edited on June 17, 2019 7:40 pm. by JimCook
Older page: version 2 Last edited on March 10, 2005 1:03 pm. by JimCook
@@ -1 +1 @@
-Hammond found that many churches resisted the design of the ConsoleOrgans as not being "traditional" (i.e. like pipe organ consoles). A pipe organ console uses pull stops or tab stops to select pipe ranks, intermanual couplers to allow the great to play the swell, toe studs to call up presets, overhanging "diving board" keys, 32-note AGO radial PedalClavier, etc. Hammond attempted to address this market in several models including the massive G-100 (the "Grand 100"). 
+Hammond found that many churches resisted the design of the ConsoleOrgans as not being "traditional" (i.e. like pipe organ consoles). A pipe organ console uses pull stops or tab stops to select pipe ranks, intermanual couplers to allow the great to play the swell, toe studs to call up presets, overhanging "diving board" keys, 32-note AGO radial PedalClavier, etc. Hammond attempted to address this market in several models including the massive [ G-100] (the "Grand 100"). 

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